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1,851 Posts in 714 Topics by 2,868 Members
Latest Member: LewisHah
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 on: January 14, 2014, 02:26:23 PM 
Started by Randallsg - Last post by Randallsg
I am considering the use of a sliding door system as part of a build for a steam shower.  Space is tight and this would solve quite a few problems.

I realize that a sliding door system can not seal as tight as a hinged/pivot.  Have you seen this used successfully before? 

Thanks, Randall

 on: December 28, 2013, 08:48:46 PM 
Started by alydame - Last post by alydame
I have a Steamist Model SM-8/Serial Number 809656 - with what appears to be a TC-135-05 Control Board.  It is installed outside of the shower.  After reading multiple manuals regarding the system, it says that it can be installed both inside AND outside of the shower.  In any case, I used my steam last night with no problem.  I was in the shower probably a little over 30 minutes.  It turned on like normal and immediately produced hot steam like always so I don't think this is the problem.  However, the steam shut itself off which I also know it can do after 30 minutes on some models.  After that happened I attempted to turn the steam back on and the control panel would not turn on at all.  No lights.  Just black.  I've looked at all of the plug-ins on the main box and it seems that everything is fine.  I've also reset all of the breakers in my home to see if that could be the issue and nothing.  Sad  Then I went on to reset all of the plugs in my home.  Still nothing.  Is there a way to reset the control board itself? 

Any help you can give will be greatly appreciated.  Thank you so much.

Aly  Smiley

 on: December 15, 2013, 06:30:46 PM 
Started by WeWantFog - Last post by WeWantFog
All is lost at the moment.  They guys doing the glas s block were clueless.  Work will stop.  Confronting contractor in the morning.  Eeek!

 on: December 13, 2013, 10:16:57 PM 
Started by WeWantFog - Last post by WeWantFog

Coming along.  Ceiling and floor are in and lots and lots of concrete.  I'm optimistic about all the concrete sucking up the heat and leaving vapor.  I love glas s brick and the two glas s brick walls are beginning to be formed.  The door guy was out today talking about aluminum frame steam room doors.

 on: December 01, 2013, 04:32:11 PM 
Started by WeWantFog - Last post by WeWantFog

Putting in the ceiling.  If it turns out that the low ceiling doesn't work for our fog obsession maybe we could take it out and just use the vaulted ceiling.  Certainly there'd be no trouble with droplets!  Also I don't think the window would hurt anything either, considering that we want fog more than heat.  We'll see.  Anyway, things are progressing.  Runs for the shower pipes have been chiseled into the brick (Mexican workers are amazing!), once the pipes are run everything will get a nice thick coat of concrete, then it's paint, fire up the generator and see what happens.  Another 3 or 4 weeks I'm thinking.

 on: November 24, 2013, 07:16:45 PM 
Started by WeWantFog - Last post by WeWantFog

State of the project 24 November 2013

 on: November 22, 2013, 03:46:36 PM 
Started by WeWantFog - Last post by WeWantFog
Thanks for the input.  As it turns out, we need the space above to have a ventilation window.  So our ceiling will end up at 7'.  They started the destruction yesterday.  It's quite exciting.  The Spanish word for "dust" is "polvo", in case you were wondering.  We have LOTS... chisels, bricks, concrete, tiles... eek.


 on: November 20, 2013, 08:03:21 AM 
Started by WeWantFog - Last post by Bernard
Thank you for the great questions on your prospective steam shower, Paul.

So the goal is for wet, rich, thick and dense fog...and little heat.  Here's how to get it done!

Vapor emissions (steam) from a 'quality' steam bath generator enter the room with latent heat.  This heat is extracted from the vapor by cool air and heat absorbent surface materials.  In simple terms, as this heat escapes, the vapor thickens leaving exactly what you desire...cool mist.  So concrete is the perfect material for your desired bath as it absorbs heat well.

As for the steam line run, so long as it does not have a trap and it is under 30', it will have little impact on your goals.

Now the room height is important.  Taller ceilings allow heat to rise and keep you cooler longer.  Eventually, the heat 'will' stack down and the temperature of the room will be a function of the steam bath generator's size and the length of time it runs.  'Do' slope the ceiling (2' per foot) as in cooler rooms, water droplets will form and eventually rain down.  Both concrete and ceramic tile are fine on the ceiling.  I suggest a ceiling height of around ten feet, however, I would prefer to size the generator for you once you have confirmed materials, exact room size and desired steam shower height.  Also, can you share more on the importance of temperature to this experience.

This will be a magnificent steam bath, Paul.  I am excited for you!

 on: November 13, 2013, 07:36:21 AM 
Started by Big Toes Bob - Last post by Lexi
Water level probes are solid steel rods and the chance of them breaking is next to impossible. The only way it could be the probes is if they were so dirty that they were allowing too much water in the tank, thus overflowing the tank and coming out of the head.

Another problem could be the steam solenoid valve if itís stuck in the open position. This would mean the tank is not closed for steam to build up and it will just pour water out. 

The master problem may be the PC board. If it is defective, it could be sending false signals to the water level probes and/or the steam solenoid, causing them to let the water flow out of the tank.

 on: November 12, 2013, 09:06:17 PM 
Started by WeWantFog - Last post by WeWantFog
Another thought:  Perhaps we want a long pipe run to the steam/shower room as well, to begin to cool the steam into fogginess before it gets to the room...  I had always assumed the the shorter the pipe run the better, but perhaps I'm wrong.  The unit will be located close to the steam/shower room.  We could even run the steam pipe in concrete for 6 feet or so before it enters the room.  Maybe that would be a good thing to help dissipate some heat before the steam/fog hits the room.


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